The fourth agreement allows readers to have a better understanding of the progress made in achieving their goals in life. This agreement involves the integration of the first three agreements into daily life and the exploitation of its own potential. [8] It is a matter of doing the best that can be managed individually, which varies from the different situations and circumstances that the individual may encounter. Ruiz believes that if you judge yourself and do your best at all times, you will be able to avoid remorse. [10] By integrating the first three chords and doing the best in all facets of life, the individual will be able to lead a life without grief or self-awareness. [10] The third agreement describes the question of whether assumptions are made about how it causes suffering and why individuals should not participate in doing so. If you assume what others think, it can create stress and interpersonal conflict, because the person thinks that his hypothesis is a representation of the truth. [10] Ruiz believes that one solution to overcome the adoption act is to ask questions and ensure that communication between those involved is clear. [9] Individuals can avoid misunderstandings, sadness and drama by not taking any assumptions. [1] I also found it strange to judge a book about the behavior of a person who claims to have read it and about the elderly who are ancestors of the author of the book. That is why I did not respond to Cccc`s comment. If the commentator explains why he/she thought the four chords meant that people were behaving ruthlessly and selfishly, I might have received an answer. As things stand, I support the idea that —Toltec or not – these principles are a healthy way of life and correspond to good practices supported by modern psychology: Ah, hello Dr.

Johnson and everyone else. I love it! If someone could tell us what the truth is, we could all “tell.” Most so-called truths are judgments. When I started as a counsellor, I taught people the standard statements “Me” and “Feel.” They came out: “I feel like a Jackass!” { : > ) We have to break many old arrangements and change a lot of domesticated beliefs to really keep a space for someone who hurts us or who is angry without judging to withdraw, defend, accuse, intellectualize, share their dream. As for intransition, this word certainly has the connotation of perfectionism, and if we take it that way, we would indeed go crazy. (Besides, the impeccability and other agreements you make with yourself, not the requirements that Ruiz imposes on you.) On the other hand, if you engage perfectly with your word as your goal, if you commit to be as honest and kind as possible with your words, without waiting for perfection of yourself or to fight if you are too short, this agreement could improve your well-being with yourself.